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History

The Yorkshire Terrier is a small dog breed of terrier type, developed in the 19th century in the county of Yorkshire,England,[3] to catch rats in clothing mills, also used for rat-baiting. The defining features of the breed are its maximum size of 7 pounds (3.2 kg] and its gray, black, and tan coat. The breed is nicknamed Yorkie and is placed in the Toy Terrier section of the Terrier Group by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale and in the Toy Group or Companion Group by other kennel clubs, including the American Kennel Club,[3] although all agree that the breed is a terrier. A popular companion dog, the Yorkshire Terrier has also been part of the development of other breeds, such as the Australian Silky Terrier.

The Yorkshire Terrier was introduced in North America in 1872 and the first Yorkshire Terrier was registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1885. The breed's popularity dipped in the 1940s, when the percentage of small breed dogs registered fell to an all-time low of 18% of total registrations.

The American Kennel Club ranked the Yorkshire Terrier as the 6th most popular pure-breed in the United States of America in 2012 and 2013

Overview

The Yorkshire Terrier, nicknamed the Yorkie, seems quite full of himself, and why not? With his long silky coat and perky topknot, the Yorkshire Terrier is one of the most glamorous representatives of the dog world, sure to attract attention wherever he goes. Because he's so small he often travels in style — in special dog purses toted around by his adoring owner.

The long steel-blue and tan coat may be the Yorkie's crowning glory, but it's his personality that truly endears him to his family. Oblivious to his small size (weighing in at no more than seven pounds), the Yorkshire Terrier is a big dog in a small body, always on the lookout for adventure and maybe even a bit of trouble.

Yorkshire Terriers are affectionate towards their people as one would expect from acompanion dog, but true to their terrier heritage, they're sometimes suspicious of strangers, and will bark at strange sounds and intruders. In consideration of your neighbors, it's important to tone down their yappiness and teach them when and when not to bark.

The ideal Yorkshire Terrier character or "personality" is described with a "carriage very upright" and "conveying an important air."[18] Though small, the Yorkshire Terrier is active, very overprotective, curious, and loves attention. Mentally sound and emotionally secure ones should normally not show the soft submissive temperament seen in lap dogs. Because of this, it is advised that a Yorkie would not be suitable for a home with typical young children—they are Terriers after all. Instead, they make ideal companions for older families with many more reputable breeders routinely only homing to families with children older than about 8 years for the comfort of the dog, but more so for the benefit of the child.

Size

Yorkshire Terriers should be 8 to 9 inches at the shoulder and weigh no more than seven pounds, with four to six pounds being preferred.

Yorkies are inconsistent in size. It's not unusual for a single litter to contain one Yorkie weighing less than four pounds, one who weighs five or six pounds, and one who grows to be 12 to 15 pounds.

Beware of breeders who offer "tea cup" Yorkshire Terriers. Dogs who are smaller than the standard are prone to genetic disorders and are at a higher health risk in general.

Care

Yorkshire Terriers enjoy taking a walk with you or playing outside, but since they're very active while indoors, it doesn't take a lot of effort to keep them well exercised.

In general, Yorkies are receptive to training, especially if it brings them attention for performing cute tricks or performing in agility or obedience trials. They can be difficult to housetrain, however, because their "accidents" are so small and easy to clean up that people let it slide. That's a mistake. It's better to show them where to go from the beginning and reward them for doing their business in the right place. When you make the effort, you can end up with a very well trained Yorkie indeed.

They definitely are housedogs and don't tolerate extreme heat or cold well. Many people paper train their Yorkshire Terriers so they don't have to take them outdoors when the weather is too hot or cold.